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"I AM NOT AN ATTORNEY LICENSED TO PRACTICE LAW IN TEXAS AND MAY NOT GIVE LEGAL ADVICE OR ACCEPT FEES FOR LEGAL ADVICE."

Updated: Jul 15, 2023


A Notary Signing Agent is a Notary who has been trained to handle loan documents. Lenders and title companies hire Signing Agents as independent contractors to assist in the last step of the loan process. What do Notary Signing Agents do? The responsibilities of a Notary Signing Agent generally include printing loan documents, meeting the signer and notarizing their signature, and quickly returning the documents for processing. NSAs are also responsible for following any additional instructions from the lender, title company or signing service that hires them for loan closing work. For example, an NSA may be asked to fax back documents right away or use a specific mailing service to return the paperwork safely. Since Notary Signing Agents have access to private financial information about borrowers and are sent into their client's home, the mortgage finance industry requires all Signing Agents to undergo a background

screening on an annual basis. This helps prevent mortgage fraud and ensures the consumer's information is secure.


Resource: National Notary Association: What is a Notary Signing Agent?

In Hispanic countries, Notarios Publicos are highly trained legal professionals akin to attorneys who provide legal advice and draft legal documents.

In the United States, however, Notaries are state-commissioned officials with narrow witnessing duties and much less discretion. Many unethical individuals exploit the confusion over these different roles to take advantage of unsuspecting immigrants.

For six decades, the National Notary Association has worked to educate Notaries, government officials and the general public about Notario abuse.

The NNA's handout "What Is A Notary Public" explains the lawful role of U.S. Notaries and how it differs from that of Notarios.

An officer may not take the acknowledgment of a written instrument unless the officer knows or has satisfactory evidence that the acknowledging person is the person who executed the instrument and is described in it. An officer may accept, as satisfactory evidence of the identity of an acknowledging person, only:

(1) the oath of a credible witness personally known to the officer;

(2) a current identification card or other document issued by the federal government or any state government that contains the photograph and signature of the acknowledging person (i.e.: Driver's License, State ID, Military ID, US Passport); or

(3) with respect to a deed or other instrument relating to a residential real estate transaction, a current passport issued by a foreign country.


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